South’s 1st Black Female Law Student’s Legacy Stronger Than Ever!

Sixty-five years ago this year, Ada Lois Sipuel Fisher became the first Black female to attend law school in the South when she enrolled at the University of Oklahoma College of Law (“OU Law”).  After initially being denied admission because she was Black, and supported by hundreds of small donations  from all over the Nation, Fisher filed a lawsuit in 1946 …

Informing, Inspiring, and Empowering Young Black Males A Must For America

  January 1, 2015 marked the 152th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation that outlawed enslavement in the Confederacy and  allowed Black men to actively participate in their own liberation.  It is without questions that since 1863, African-Americans have overcome many hurdles, shattered numerous barriers, and set countless precedents on the way to freedom, justice, and equality in the United States. …

5 Facts You Should Know About the Selma Voting Rights Struggle

Source:  Staff Writer/The Root.Com Selma—director Ava DuVernay’s epic film about Martin Luther King Jr. and the  struggle for voting rights in the Deep South—is set to hit theaters nationwide on Friday. Over the past few weeks, the film has taken a little heat for its depiction of President Lyndon B. Johnson as an obstructionist to a voting-rights bill, with former …